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12% donated to U.S. Veterans and mental health initiatives

We believe in giving back to others and truly making a difference. That’s why we are donating 12% of our total sales, not just profits, to organizations that support U.S. Veterans and mental health initiatives. As Veterans ourselves, we know the struggles that one can face and want to be part of the solution.

Significance of the guidon in military tradition.

Why our brand is called “The Charge”

We (Travis Gardner and Tucker Burns) met while in the Corps of Cadets at Texas A&M and became friends while involved with Parsons’ Mounted Cavalry, the last remaining horse-mounted ROTC unit in the country. We want our brand to be personally symbolic, but to also contain a meaning with which others can resonate. After months of brainstorming, we decided on “The Charge.”

Throughout history, a cavalry charge was iconically an army’s most feared and revered battle tactic. It could quickly win a battle, but was difficult to execute and so considered a very risky maneuver. When a commanding officer (CO) gave the order, it wasn’t done lightly; the complexity and risks were understood by all. As a result, COs who called for a charge have been and are remembered still for heroism and bravery regardless of the battle’s outcome.

Made in the USA

Our polos and shirts are made in the USA and we desire to move our hat production here in the near future. We believe in supporting U.S. jobs and strive to produce the highest quality clothing. To that end, we are defying the fashion norm by investing more to manufacture our apparel in the USA.

We love that symbolism.

We believe that everyone has a charge be it personal, professional, or relational.

However, most people are too scared to pursue it. They see only risks, meditate on doubt and fear, never running toward what they are called to do. But we’re here to tell you there are worse things in life than pursuing something and failing. Unlike the COs that called for a cavalry charge, if we fail, we’re probably still alive. We can dust ourselves off and try again. At least we don’t have to live with the regret, sitting in mediocrity, years down the road asking ourselves “what if?” All the while, feeling like victims of our current situation, instead of accepting the fact that we’ve become victims of our own choices.

The goal of this company is to make superior quality polos and shirts while inspiring others to achieve their full potential. At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter whether you succeed or fail; all that matters is that you passionately pursue what is important to you.

How we came up with our logo:

We initially received inspiration for our logo from the George Washington battle flag, which is comprised of 13 six-pointed stars, representing the 13 original colonies. This flag was flown whenever Washington was on the battlefield so that everyone knew he, the authority figure, was present. Most commanders in that era did not want to stand out. Even to this day, officers wear subdued rank in the deployed environment, so that they are less of a target to enemy forces.

We love the confidence and symbolism that Washington embodied by flying this flag, which is what led us to use six-pointed stars in our logo. We incorporated 6 of these stars because Washington is only one of two US military leaders ever awarded the 6 star rank.

When people wear our brand, we want them to walk in the confidence and boldness that Washington displayed on the battlefield. We want their presence to be known, not just because they’re wearing high-quality apparel, but also by the way they carry themselves. We want them to bring the mindset from the battlefield to the boardroom, and beyond.

We chose to utilize a classic guidon-shaped field as the base for our logo. This type of flag shape has historically rich ties both to the military in general, as well as individual cavalry units, which is where the flag originated in 1834.

The guidon is a symbol used to represent a specific unit and the commander in charge of the unit. It is identified as a rallying point for troops to gather around, as they fall into formation and receive orders. Most units have significant pride for their guidon, as it symbolizes the character and identity of the members which comprise the unit.

As we grow our brand, we hope to become a rallying point for individuals who strive to be and look their best in various arenas of influence (business, sports, military, etc).

Our founders

Travis Gardner

Upon graduating from Texas A&M in 2014, Travis commissioned into the USAF, and served as a Special Agent with the Air Force Office of Special Investigations. Travis made the decision to separate from the military in 2020, as he had accepted a job offer to continue Special Investigations with the FBI. However, while on a mission trip to South America, Travis felt led to turn down the opportunity with the FBI and move back to Texas to pursue a ministry opportunity. Travis and his family moved back to Texas in February 2020, and he began pursuing a graduate degree in seminary, while working a full time job. Travis ultimately realized his calling was not within the confines of a physical church, but through the communities he had been a part of (military, law enforcement, first responder).

During Travis’ time as a Special Agent, he was exposed to multiple horrifying acts to adults and children that led to him seeking mental health providers. Through navigating the stigmas of this in the military, as well as seeing the effects of mental health issues that were not addressed, Travis felt a desire to positively impact this sphere of influence. After multiple meetings with Tucker, they realized the impact they could have on society through the apparel industry, and the idea of The Charge Stately Apparel was born, with their primary mission being to give back to Veterans and mental health initiatives.

Tucker Burns

After graduation from Texas A&M in 2014, Tucker joined the United States Army, and served as an Armor Officer for the next few years. In 2018, Tucker transitioned out of the Army and returned to Texas A&M, earning a Masters degree in Land Economics and Real Estate at Mays Business School. During his graduate studies, Tucker interned in Shanghai, China, where he worked closely with executives in the manufacturing, distribution, and supply chain industries; opening his eyes to the importance of bringing industry back to the US. Tucker then went on to pursue a career in commercial real estate. Shortly thereafter he was diagnosed with a brain tumor, which was especially traumatic as he lost his father to the same diagnosis at an early age. Recognizing the financial burden placed on individuals receiving this kind of news spurred Tucker’s aspiration to create a way to fund the fight against brain cancer, and  stigma associated with this kind of diagnosis.

Considering the opportunity to do so through constructing a company with Travis, built on the foundation of helping others, just morals, and ethical cause drove this idea into reality; bringing attention to charities that not only support brain cancer research, but mental health initiatives as a whole, while also serving the Veteran community in which Travis and Tucker belong.